Resources

 

For Youth For Adults For Families For Businesses

For Youth

American Indian Magnet School
1075 3rd Street East
Saint Paul, MN 55106-5750
Phone: 651.778.3100
aims.spps.org

At the American Indian Magnet School students study the rich history, culture and language area tribes including Ojibwe and D/Lakota. A strong sense of community is built through an emphasis on core values including respect, love, courage, wisdom, honesty, humility, and truth. Ojibwe and D/Lakota specialists also provide language and cultural opportunities for the students and staff.


Anishinabe Academy
3100 East 28th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55406
Phone: 612.668.0880 | Fax: 612.668.0890
anishinabe.mpls.k12.mn.us

Dedicated to serving American Indians students in grades K through 8 and their families through educational success with emphasize on American Indian culture.


MIGIZI Communications
1516 East Lake Street #300
Minneapolis, MN 55407
Phone: 612.721.6631 | Fax: 612.721.3936
www.migizi.org

MIGIZI Communication’s mission is to effect and contribute to social justice and positive change by committing resources to telecommunications, education, health & wellness, and other areas that contribute to capacity-building within the American Indian Community. MIGIZI’s goals include: increasing the graduation rate and postsecondary enrollment rate of Indian students, and strengthening American Indian families through culture-based programming. MIGIZI celebrated its 30th year of service to the Indian community in 2007.

Programs:
Native Academy
First Person Productions
Youth Development
Seasonal Cultural Camps


National Runaway Safeline (Formerly known as National Runaway Switchboard)
3080 N. Lincoln Ave
Chicago, IL 60657
Phone: 1.800.RUNAWAY or 1.800.786.2929 | Business Office: 773.880.9860
www.1800runaway.org

Keeping America’s runaway, homeless and at-risk youth safe and off the streets.

Between 1.6 and 2.8 million youth run away in a year.

Call 1.800.RUNAWAY if you are a teenager who is thinking of running from home, if you have a friend who has run and is looking for help, or if you are a runaway ready to go home.

Call 1.800.RUNAWAY if you care about a youth and want information on how you can help someone who may be at risk of running from home.

Call 1.800.RUNAWAY if you are a teacher looking for information to pass along to your students about youth homelessness or the reality of life on the streets.

Our 24-hour crisis line has an experienced front-line team member ready to help you now. It’s anonymous, confidential and free. 1.800.RUNAWAY.


Nawayee Center School
2421 Bloomington Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.721.1655 | Fax: 612.721.5346
www.centerschool.org

Center School is a Phillip’s neighborhood alternative junior and senior high school for at-risk American Indian youth. The goal is to provide quality culturally-based education in an interdisciplinary learning environment for junior high students and to enhance the post-secondary readiness and employability of the senior high students. NA-WAY-EE is an Ojibwe term that means ‘the center’.


Ramsey County Children’s Mental Health Collaborative
www.rccmhc.org

The Ramsey County Children’s Mental Health Collaborative (RCCMHC) is a partnership of 35+ members including parents, private and county mental health providers, juvenile corrections and local school districts. We are committed to maintaining and improving mental health/behavioral health needs of children within the context of their family.


Ramsey County Children’s Mental Health Services and Children’s Crises Response

CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH CASE MANAGEMENT
Contact Information:

Program Description: Case Management is designed to serve families with children who have severe emotional and behavioral disturbances. In a culturally sensitive manner, case managers help families:

  • Develop a treatment plan and a crisis plan
  • Provide information about and referral to community resources
  • Create a supportive team of family, professionals, and community members
  • Assist parents in advocating for their child’s mental health needs
  • Access respite care and other supports

Eligibility: In order to receive case management services:

  • A child must have a current SED diagnosis
  • The child must reside in Ramsey County
  • The child’s family must request or consent to services

CHILDREN’S CRISIS RESPONSE
Contact Information: 651.774.7000

Program Description: Children’s Crisis response offers on-site response to children in homes, schools, or institutions. Services are available 24 hours per day, every day in Ramsey County.

  • Services include de-escalation and crisis intervention; a thorough mental health assessment to determine any mental health issues; and development of an initial crisis plan
  • Follow-up short term care of up to two weeks following the crisis, including transition to ongoing treatment, and crisis recurrence reduction strategies
  • Over 90% of home-based crisis calls have been stabilized with the child remaining at home
    Spanish and Hmong language supports are available
  • Services are provided by licensed mental health professionals or mental health practitioners under the supervision of a mental health professional
  • Ramsey County is partnering with St. Paul Youth Service Bureau to provide the Children’s Crisis Response team

Eligibility: All crisis services are available to anyone regardless of ability to pay or insurance type.


St. Paul Public Schools Indian Education
65 E. Kellogg Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55101
Phone: 651.293.5191
indianeducation.spps.org

The American Indian Education Programs offered through the Saint Paul Public School District 625 is in existence to preserve and present the unique political, sovereign, cultural, traditional, and spiritual values of American Indian nations through education.


YouthLink
41 North 12th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55403
Phone: 612.252.1200 | Fax: 612.252.1201
www.youthlinkmn.org

Youth and Family Case Management. Case managers develop individualized program plans with each youth, assessing his/ her needs, strengths and skills. Outreach visits occur in homes, neighborhoods and schools. Most referrals are from schools, court diversion and county workers. The Truancy Intervention MY Academy Alternative School is an on-site school for 9th and 10th grade students. Please call for further information or to set up an appointment.

Programs:
Project Offstreets
New Path Partner
Intervention Program


For Families

American Indian Community Development Corporation
1508 East Franklin Avenue
Minneapolis MN 55404
Phone: 612.813.1610
www.aicdc-mn.org

AICDC is here to develop and provide culturally creative programs, support and educational services designed to strengthen American Indian communities by offering opportunities for a better quality of life.

Our goals and objectives:

  • Provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing within a primarily American Indian community to homeless persons and provide permanent affordable housing for low and moderate income persons.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to persons within a primarily American Indian community in the areas of housing, rehabilitation, upkeep and maintenance, and management of residential housing units.
  • Conduct research, and gather data to be analyzed to formulate policy in the area of housing. Serve as an information clearing house by providing quality technical assistance and advice to other organizations and persons with similar goals.
  • Engage in demonstration projects which will develop experimental and creative approaches to provide housing within a primarily American Indian community for homeless and low and moderate income per sons with special needs such as chemical dependency, mental health problems, HIV/AIDS-afflicted, and other debilitating conditions.
  • Combat community deterioration in an area primarily populated by American Indian persons by rehabilitating poorly-maintained residential housing units occupied by low- and moderate-income persons.
  • Provide information and advice to homeless, low- and moderate-income persons as to their rights and responsibilities under applicable housing law.
  • Work in cooperation with American Indian tribal governments in social, educational and housing projects which are designed to inform homeless and low- and moderate-income persons about the availability of such programs on or off Indian reservations.

American Indian Family & Children’s Services
Foster Care Licensing Program
25 Empire Dr.
St. Paul, MN 55103
Phone: 651.223.8526 | Toll Free: 866.223.8330 | Fax: 651.223.8529
www.aifacs.org

American Indian Family and Children’s Services (AIFACS) has been licensing, training and supervising American Indian foster homes for 25 years. Our foster parents provide a culturally appropriate home for American Indian children. They often open their homes and hearts to children so that they can live among other American Indian people and are able to keep their traditions alive.


American Indian Family Center
579 Wells St.
St. Paul, MN 55130-4134
Phone: 651.793.3803 | Fax: 651.793.3809
www.aifc.net

The American Indian Family Center was initially started as an idea in 1994 under the umbrealla of the Ramsey County Children’s Initiative. In 1995, a location was identified and the doors opened to families for services in 1997.

Programming Philosophy
In all programming, the AIFC views each program participant holistically, in the philosophy of the medicine wheel, which teaches that the four parts of each human being – physical, sprititual, emotional and intellectual are equally important. Thus interventions for any one area must include an assessment of the other areas. All AIFC programming focuses on bringing traditional values to bear on the challenges facing our families today. We are finding success in connecting with these values to fulfill our mission of healthier families. With all of our programming, the AIFC promotes building relationships and seeks genuine participation from the community. The AIFC pulls together partner agencies and community resources that serve the American Indian community so that access to services is increased. In most of our programs and services, we rely on some or all of the American Indian serving agencies in St Paul. Many of these partners are able to provide access to community members, resources to supplement our program activities, and support to our parents and staff as they work with the community.

Services
Over the years, the growth experienced by the AIFC has provided an opportunity to better understand the varying needs of our community. The services provided by the AIFC are now structured under two program areas, Family Support Services and Employment Support Services. The Family Support Services include mental health services, prevention and recovery services, prevention and intervention of child neglect and abuse, parenting support and youth work. The Employment Support services include one on one employment counseling, development of job readiness skills and job club support.

Programs:
Father’s Circle
Mother’s Circle
Mental Health Services
Our Children are Sacred Program
Community Doula Program
Twin Cities Healthy Start Program
Medicine Wheel Collaborative
Women’s Health Program
Youth Programming
First Nations Sports Initiative
Enable Project
Girls Best Initiative
Multi-Generational Learning Project


Baby’s Space
Baby’s Space at Little Earth
2438 18th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.729.5171 | Fax: 612.729.5228
www.babyspace.org

Provides integrated infant and toddler childcare with family support for Native American families.


Community-University Health Care Center
2001 Bloomington Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
612-638-0700
www.cuhcc.umn.edu

CUHCC provides medical, dental, mental health, advocacy, and legal services to children and low income families in South Minneapolis. CUHCC strives to provide culturally competent care to a diverse population, with on-site interpreters in many languages.


Circle of Indigenous Nations
322 Pleasant Street SE, Appleby Hall
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: 612.624.2555 | Fax: 612.626.7840
https://diversity.umn.edu/multicultural/coin

The American Indian Learning Resource Center provides family centered services that ensure quality student experiences through utilization of Indigenous thoughts and values. The center promotes academic excellence through personal contact, advocacy, technology, and program development. The center fosters an Indigenous environment that allows students to feel a sense of community on campus. The center contributes to the strengthening and development of all students through culturally specific services.


Civil Society
1st National Bank Building
332 Minnesota St, Suite E-1436
St. Paul, MN 55101
Phone: 651.291.8810 | Fax: 651.291.2588
Crisis & TipLine for Human Trafficking & Sexual Assult Victims 888.772.3324
civilsocietyhelps.org

We are a Minnesota based non-profit organization that offers legal and social services to victims of trafficking, sexual assault and abuse.

Civil Society, founded by Linda Miller in 1996, is a vital and unique link in the safety net of legal services for victims of human trafficking, through programs including:

Legal Services for sexual assault and human trafficking victims
Court Advocacy/Accompaniment
Minnesota Crime Victims Reparation Board (assistance with application)
Community education and training
Assistance with Orders For Protection (OFP) & Harassment Restraining Orders (HRO)
Interpretation and translation services for victims
More services are available!
Civil Society is proud to be the MN Rescue and Restore Victims of Human Trafficking coalition leader.


Community Initiatives for Children
411 E. 38th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55409
Phone: 612.871.0662 | Fax: 612.870.0456
www.community-initiatives.org

A grassroots organization that provides resources for families to educate children & empower families.

Programs:
Child Connections
HIPPY Program (Home Instruction Program Preschool Youngsters)
Library on wheels
Reading is Fundamental Program


Division of Indian Work
Greater Minneapolis Council of Churches
1001 East Lake St.
Minneapolis, MN 55407-0509
Phone: 612.721.8687 | Fax: 612.276.1534
http://www.gmcc.org/

Since 1952, the Division of Indian Work (DIW) has empowered American Indian people through culturally based advocacy, education, counseling and leadership development.

DIW operates:

  • An Indian parenting program
  • Reduced-rent apartments for young parents who cannot find affordable housing
  • A family violence counseling program
  • A food shelf that also offers nutrition classes
  • A youth mentoring and tutoring program with a teen pregnancy prevention component
  • A loving home for American Indian foster children
  • A recovery program to help American Indians who have completed chemical dependency treatment but who need help maintaining their sobriety

To rise above poverty, American Indian families living in Minneapolis need a connection often forgotten by today’s society. It is critical that Indian adults and children be linked to their sacred cultural past. It is that link, combined with education, mentoring, and family counseling, that will empower them to proudly claim their place in this world. The Division of Indian Work establishes that link with powerful results.


Greater Twin Cities United Way
404 South Eighth Street
Minneapolis, MN 55404-1084
Phone: 612.340.7400
If you are in need of community resources, contact our information and referral line, United Way 2-1-1, by dialing 2-1-1 from a land line or 651.291.0211 from a cell phone.
www.gtcuw.org

Greater Twin Cities United Way creates a better life for us all by focusing on three key areas: Education, Stabilizing families, helping children succeed and empowering healthy lives.

We attack poverty on multiple, interconnected fronts to achieve lasting change. We LIVE UNITED by collaborating with partner agencies, corporations, community leaders and people like you.

United Way serves people living in or near poverty in nine counties: Anoka, Carver, Chisago, Dakota, Hennepin, Isanti, Ramsey, Scott and western Washington.


Indian Health Board
1315 East 24th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.721.9800
www.indianhealthboard.com

The Indian Health Board (IHB) of Minneapolis was incorporated in 1971 to provide for the health needs of the American Indian community living in Minneapolis. IHB provides medical and dental care and counseling services to more than 7,000 patients each year in its offices at 1315 East 24th Street in the heart of Minneapolis’ Phillips neighborhood.

First, IHB provides high-quality medical, counseling and dental services through fully trained providers with advanced medical and health management education. Many are involved in community service and outreach programs that work to strengthen the futures of American Indians.

Second, through special funding sources, quality health care services and programs are available to all patients with or without health insurance. To ensure services are accessible to all, a sliding fee scale is offered to private pay patients based on their income level. A drug discount program also is available to qualifying IHB patients with discounts up to 50 percent.

IHB provides medical, counseling, and dental services through fully trained providers. Medical services include primary, adult, OB/GYN and pediatric care with emphasis on family planning, diabetes care, and health wellness and education.

Mental health services include individual and family counseling, psychological assessment, consultation with schools and other community agencies as well as social work services and support groups. Dental services include adult and child dentistry, emergency treatment, specialist referral, and preventive care and education.


Legal Assistance
Southern Minnesota Regional Legal Services
888.575.2954
www.smrls.org

SMRLS provides free, high-quality legal services to low-income people in critical civil matters. Approaching each client with the respect and compassion, we help individuals and families maintain freedom from hunger, homelessness, sickness, and abuse. Each year, staff and volunteers close approximately 10,000 cases, serving an additional 20,000 people through community education and outreach activities.

 


Minneapolis American Indian Center
1530 E Franklin Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.879.1700 | Fax: 612.879.1795
www.maicnet.org

The Minneapolis American Indian Center Incorporated as nonprofit in 1974, the Minneapolis American Indian Center has a rich history as one of the first urban American Indian Centers in the country providing services otherwise often unavailable for urban American Indians. The Minneapolis American Indian Center was initially formed by community members, and continues its roots today with majority American Indian leadership and staffing.

The Minneapolis American Indian Center is focused on serving a large and tribally diverse urban American Indian population, numbering well over 35,000 in the eleven County Minneapolis-St. Paul metro areas. Our mission is lived through programs that are guided by strong Native values that include preserving and supporting cultural traditions through the arts, and intergeneration programs promoting healthy lifestyles.


MN Indian Women’s Resource Center
2300 15th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.728.2000
www.miwrc.org

The Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center (MIWRC) is a non-profit social and educational services organization committed to the holistic growth and development of American Indian women and their families. Founded in 1984, MIWRC provides a broad range of programs designed to educate and empower American Indian women and their families, and to inform and assist those who work providing services to the community.

MIWRC is located in the Phillips neighborhood of Minneapolis, which has the third largest urban American Indian population in the United States. MIWRC is the only organization addressing the gender and culturally specific needs of our community.

Programs are developed to reflect the needs of our families, and are tailored to address issues that significantly affect their well-being; such as family services, child advocacy, child care services, legal services, affordable housing, parenting skills, chemical dependency, mental health care, cultural resilience, historical trauma and many other family and community issues.


Neighborhood Justice Center
500 Laurel Ave
St. Paul, MN 55102-2020
Phone: 651.222.4703 | Fax: 651.925.0112
www.njcinc.org

NJC is legal service corporation that has been providing comprehensive criminal defense services to low-income and indigent people in the East Metro area with a focus on communities of color since 1973. The agency focuses its work in St. Paul, Minnesota, and the surrounding East Metro area.
Learn more about the services and vital role the Neighborhood Justice Center provides the community.
The agency focuses its work in St. Paul, Minnesota, and the surrounding East Metro area.


Tiwahe Foundation
2801 21st Ave South, Suite 132F
Minneapolis, MN 55407
Office: 612.722.0999
www.tiwahefoundation.org

History of the Tiwahe Foundation

The Tiwahe Foundation grew out of a culturally responsive grantmaking initiative, the American Indian Family Empowerment Program (AIFEP) which was launched in 1993. The Marbrook Foundation was the founding organization, with Markell Brooks as the inspiration for AIFEP. AIFEP operated as a donor designated fund for 16 years, funded by Marbrook, Westcliff, and Grotto Foundations. The partnership represented a model for collaborative philanthropic engagement. With the leadership of the AFIEP advisory board, leadership program participants, staff and the founding philanthropic partners, in 2009 the Tiwahe Foundation became the first-of-its-kind independent community foundation.

Tiwahe Foundation Today

The Tiwahe Foundation was created to help renew the American Indian community through the Circle of Giving. This philosophy is grounded in American Indian tradition and the value of reciprocity, recognizing that all life is inter-related and giving benefits the giver as well as the receiver. The Tiwahe Foundation is a trusted community partner with an intimate understanding of issues that affect Native American people, as well as the role American Indian values, such as generosity, compassion, courage and resilience, play in building a self-sustaining community.


The Office of Ombudsperson for Families
1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 106
St. Paul, Minnesota 55108
Phone: 651.643.2523
www.mn.gov/ombudfam

The Office of Ombudsperson for Families is an independant state agency.There are four ombudspersons working with four different communities of color. Each Ombudsperson works independently from but in collaboration with each of the following groups: the Indian Affairs Council, the Chicano Latino Affairs Council, the Council on Black Minnesotans, and the Council on Asian-Pacific Minnesotans.


Women of Nations, Eagles Nest Shelter
Battered Women’s Shelter
Phone: 651.251.1603 | Fax: 651.222.1207 | Crisis Line: 651.222.5836
www.women-of-nations.org

Rooted in American Indian culture, Women of Nations welcomes and honors “All Our Relations” as together we inspire hope and healing to embrace a vision of peace and justice.

Family and Community Advocates work tirelessly to support battered women and their children. Women of Nations partners with a variety of public and private agencies to leverage resources and ensure effective, culturally appropriate services. Current programs include:

  • Family and Native Youth Crisis Line and Crisis Intervention, responding to nearly 700 calls annually
  • Eagles Nest Shelter, providing safe sanctuary, support and case management to over 600 women and children each year
  • Community Advocacy Program, providing advocacy and support to over 1,100 individuals yearly

For Adults

1st Tribal Lending
Minneapolis Field Office
International Center
920 Second Avenue South
Suite 1300
Minneapolis MN 55402-4012
Field Office Director (612) 370-3000 | Fax (612) 370-3218
www.1tribal.com/howitworks

The Section 184 Indian Home Loan Guarantee Program is a home mortgage specifically designed for American Indian and Alaska Native families, Alaska Villages, Tribes, or Tribally Designated Housing Entities. Section 184 loans can be used, both on and off native lands, for new construction, rehabilitation, purchase of an existing home, or refinance.

Because of the unique status of Indian lands being held in Trust, Native American homeownership has historically been an underserved market. Working with an expanding network of private sector and tribal partners, the Section 184 Program endeavors to increase access to capital for Native Americans and provide private funding opportunities for tribal housing agencies with the Section 184 Program.

To help increase Native access to financing, the Office of Loan Guarantee within HUD’s Office of Native American Programs, guarantees the Section 184 home mortgage loans made to Native Borrowers. By providing this guarantee, HUD has made it possible for lenders to serve Native Communities both on and off the reservation. This increases the marketability and value of the Native assets and strengthens the financial standing of Native Communities.

Section 184 is synonymous with home ownership in Indian Country. As of January 2012, the Section 184 program has guaranteed over 15,000 loans (almost $2.5 billion dollars in guaranteed funds) to individuals, Tribes, and TDHEs.


AffordableColleges.com
Guide to College for LGBTQ Students
Erica Carson
ericacarson@affordablecolleges.com
AffordableColleges.com
PO Box 52755
Houston, TX 77052

AffordableColleges.com recently published a guide to college for LGBTQ students. It includes scholarships for LGBTQ students, strategies for assessing the inclusivity of a college based on its policies and resources to help with the transition to college.

For more information, you can take a look here: http://www.affordablecolleges.com/resources/lgbtq-college-resources/.


American Indian Family Center
579 Wells St.
St. Paul, MN 55130
Phone: 651.793.3803 | Fax: 651.793.3809
www.aifc.net

The American Indian Family Center was initially started as an idea in 1994 under the umbrealla of the Ramsey County Children’s Initiative. In 1995, a location was identified and the doors opened to families for services in 1997.

Programming Philosophy
In all programming, the AIFC views each program participant holistically, in the philosophy of the medicine wheel, which teaches that the four parts of each human being – physical, sprititual, emotional and intellectual are equally important. Thus interventions for any one area must include an assessment of the other areas. All AIFC programming focuses on bringing traditional values to bear on the challenges facing our families today. We are finding success in connecting with these values to fulfill our mission of healthier families. With all of our programming, the AIFC promotes building relationships and seeks genuine participation from the community. The AIFC pulls together partner agencies and community resources that serve the American Indian community so that access to services is increased. In most of our programs and services, we rely on some or all of the American Indian serving agencies in St Paul. Many of these partners are able to provide access to community members, resources to supplement our program activities, and support to our parents and staff as they work with the community.

Services
Over the years, the growth experienced by the AIFC has provided an opportunity to better understand the varying needs of our community. The services provided by the AIFC are now structured under two program areas, Family Support Services and Employment Support Services. The Family Support Services include mental health services, prevention and recovery services, prevention and intervention of child neglect and abuse, parenting support and youth work. The Employment Support services include one on one employment counseling, development of job readiness skills and job club support.

Programs:
Father’s Circle
Mother’s Circle
Mental Health Services
Our Children are Sacred Program
Community Doula Program
Twin Cities Healthy Start Program
Medicine Wheel Collaborative
Women’s Health Program
Youth Programming
First Nations Sports Initiative
Enable Project
Girls Best Initiative
Multi-Generational Learning Project


American Indian OIC
1845 East Franklin Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.341.3358 | Fax: 612.341.3766
www.aioic.org

American Indian Opportunities Industrialization Center (AIOIC) is a non-profit organization with a mission to empower American Indians to pursue career opportunities by providing individualized education, training, and employment services in a culturally rich environment.

We are passionate about bringing positive change in the lives of the people we meet. This passion has driven us to provide opportunities for people to become independent, self-sufficient, and productive. Our programs give them access to a stable and meaningful future.


American Indian Student Cultural Center
University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
234 Coffman Memorial Union
300 Washington Ave. S.E.
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: 612.624.0243
https://gopherlink.umn.edu/organization/274/about

The mission of AISCC is to promote cultural diversity; develop leadership in American Indian students at the U of M; assist in building an understanding of American Indian people, issues, history and culture, by bringing in native scholars and hosting events open to the entire university campus.


American Indian Studies Department
Department of American Indian Studies
19 Scott Hall
72 Pleasant St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
Phone: 612.624.1338 | Fax: 612.626.7904
www.amin.umn.edu

Established in June of 1969, the Department of American Indian Studies is the oldest program of its kind in the U.S. with departmental status. Established amidst the civil rights struggles of the sixties and early seventies, the program has long been committed to the development of theories and methodologies that reflect American Indian perspectives and embraces knowledge which stands in contrast to the linear analytic Euro-American studies typically found in colleges and universities.


American Indian Student Services
Augsburg College Campus Box 307
2211 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454
Phone: 612.330.1144 | Fax: 612.330.1695
www.augsburg.edu/aissp

The American Indian Student Services program was started in 1978 to help recruit and retain American Indian students. The program is designed to assist students through their higher education by assisting in the admissions and registration process, assisting with financial aid and other financial resources, offering support and advocacy for students and assisting in educating the campus community about the culture and traditions of our many nations. Augsburg College has approximately forty-five American Indian students enrolled each year.


Adult Education Program, Ronald M. Hubbs Center
Phone: 651.290.4822
hubbs.spps.org

The Ronald M. Hubbs Center for Lifelong Learning (Adult Basic Education) is a program of the Saint Paul Public Schools’ Community Education Department. Educational services are available to adults who want to improve their basic skills, earn a GED, prepare for employment or post-secondary education, or learn English.
The Hubbs Center is also a partner in the Saint Paul Community Literacy Consortium, a collaboration of agencies throughout Saint Paul that provide literacy services to adults in our community.


Anoka Hennepin Indian Education
Educational Service Center
2727 N Ferry St.
Anoka, MN 55303
Phone: 763.506.1159 | Fax: 763.506.1003
http://www.anoka.k12.mn.us/Page/18377

It is the purpose of the Anoka-Hennepin Indian Education Parent Advisory Committee and Indian Education Program to encourage and inspire academic achievement, social and emotional development, and cultural awareness of our American Indian Students. We serve as a resource to review and recommend accurate curriculum and to promote cultural diversity between community, staff and students.


Department of Indian Work
1671 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105
Phone: 651.789.3854 | Fax: 651.646.6866
http://interfaithaction.org/diw

The Department of Indian Work (DIW) addresses needs and issues in the American Indian community, respecting the cultural and spiritual diversity of the people it serves. DIW develops and coordinates programs which empower American Indian people toward self-determination.


Domestic Abuse Project
204 West Franklin Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.874.7063 | Toll Free: 1.800.793.5975 | Fax: 612.874.8445
www.domesticabuseproject.org
24-hour Domestic Violence Crisis Line – 1.866.223.1111
24-hour line for men – 612.379.6367 (the Men’s Line)

Programs:
Advocacy
Evaluation and Research
Therapy Program
Training and Community Education


Elder’s Lodge
Senior Housing
1500 Magnolia Ave E
St. Paul, MN 55106
Phone: 651.778.2501
Aptartment Information:https://affordablehousingonline.com/housing-search/Minnesota/Saint-Paul/Elders-Lodge/10017994

The Elders Lodge is viewed as a center of wisdom, warmth and strength in the Native American community. Traditionally, Elders maintain a special position in the tribe. To be a Native American Elder is to be respected, revered and to be honored. The roles of these special people were to teach, to carry on the ways of the people, to pass on oral tradition, to be a consultant on the ways of spirituality, philosophy, medicine, healing, peace, war and survival. The Lodge is nestled in a natural setting within a circle of trees as in the circle of life in which one lives. The landscape emphasizes the four seasons. These ideas are carried into the community ceremonial room and to the apartments for the Elders. The Elders Lodge will have 42 one bedroom apartments in a three story brick building. The Lodge will provide congregate dining in the community room, a full service kitchen, areas for fitness, health screening, crafts, sewing, meetings, library resources and laundry. The community room will serve as a center for ceremonies and activities centered around the Elders, their knowledge and desire to pass on cultural traditions and values to their children and grandchildren. The Elders Lodge will be marketed to Native American Elders but will be open to all seniors. The Lodge will operate under HUD Section 202 with Section 8 Rent subsidy.


Eden II’s Women’s Program
1025 Portland Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.338.0723 | Fax: 612.338.3653
www.rseden.org

Women’s Residential and Non-residential programs, Eden Family program and Inhalant Abuse program.


Energy Assistance – Community Action Partnership of Suburban Hennepin
Minnesota Council of Churches
122 W Franklin Ave, 5th floor
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone 952-933-9639
Fax 952-933-8016

http://www.capsh.org/

Services Available: Energy Assistance, Supportive Services for Veteran Families


Fairview Chemical Dependency Treatment Services
2312 South 6th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55454
Phone: 612.672.2736 | Fax: 612.672.6657
http://www.fairview.org/Services/BehavioralHealth/index.htm

Referrals can be made to Forest Lake-Residential Facility, 651.982.2069. FCDTS has cultural support services that include specific cultural programming addressing the needs of Native American and African American clients including: culturally relevant patient education, ongoing community-based support, client advocacy, and cultural support groups. Financial arrangements: most health insurance plans will cover all or part of treatment. Referrals can be made by family members or professionals from medical, school, court or social agencies. Primary treatment for clients age 12 to 18, and extended services for clients ages 12 to 24.


FATHER Project
Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota
2700 E Lake St.
Minneapolis, MN 55406
Phone: 612.724.3539 | Fax: 612.724.3531
https://www.goodwilleasterseals.org/services/additional-services/father

Founded in 1999, the FATHER Project was originally administered by the City of Minneapolis and became a program of Goodwill-Easter Seals Minnesota in 2004. Since then, the FATHER Project has served hundreds of fathers in the community through our extensive network of collaborative partners. The FATHER Project has received national recognition as an effective and innovative program and in 2012 received federal grant funding to expand to other Minnesota communities. We have locations in Minneapolis (main office), Park Rapids, Rochester, St. Cloud and St. Paul

The FATHER Project’s mission is to assist fathers in overcoming the barriers that prevent them from supporting their children economically and emotionally.


Fathers’ Resource Center
Human Services Building, Suite 224
1201 89th Avenue NE
Blaine, Minnesota 55434
Phone: 763.783.4938 | Fax: 763.783.4900

Fathers’ support groups, parenting classes, family law clinics, transitional housing, father-to-father, shared parenting, educational workshops, speakers’ bureau, dealing with anger. The Fathers’ Resource Center serves 5 locations, Minneapolis: 430 Oak Grove, Mpls, Phone: 612.874.1509

St. Paul: 1030 University Avenue West, Suite 160, St. Paul, Phone: 763.783.4938


First Nations Recovery Center
2020 Bloomington Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.871.1208
www.overcomerministries.org

A Native American, outpatient, intensive 26 week treatment program providing mental and chemical health services, gender specific group, living skills development, emotional/relational development, family education counseling, and optional spiritual and Christian groups. Clients have the opportunity to participate in unique activities such as sobriety feasts, cultural activities: maple sugaring, wild rice harvesting, and educational day trips to reservations in Minnesota and Wisconsin First Nations Recovery Center is a Native safe and respectful environment where clients can find the direction for their lives. Both day and evening treatment programs are available depending on client’s family and job commitments.


HUD 184 184 Indian Home Loan Guarantee Program
Minneapolis Field Office
International Center
920 Second Avenue South
Suite 1300
Minneapolis MN 55402-4012
Field Office Director (612) 370-3000
Fax (612) 370-3218

http://hud184loans.com/

The Section 184 Indian Home Loan Guarantee Program is a home mortgage specifically designed for American Indian and Alaska Native families, Alaska Villages, Tribes, or Tribally Designated Housing Entities. Section 184 loans can be used, both on and off native lands, for new construction, rehabilitation, purchase of an existing home, or refinance.What is the Section 184 Loan Guarantee Program?

Because of the unique status of Indian lands being held in Trust, Native American homeownership has historically been an underserved market. Working with an expanding network of private sector and tribal partners, the Section 184 Program endeavors to increase access to capital for Native Americans and provide private funding opportunities for tribal housing agencies with the Section 184 Program.

To help increase Native access to financing, the Office of Loan Guarantee within HUD’s Office of Native American Programs, guarantees the Section 184 home mortgage loans made to Native Borrowers. By guaranteeing these loans 100%, we encourage Lenders to serve the Native Communities. This increases the marketability and value of the Native assets and strengthens the financial standing of Native Communities.

Section 184 is synonymous with home ownership in Indian Country. As of 2014, the Section 184 program has guaranteed over 24,000 loans (almost $4 billion dollars in guaranteed funds) to individuals, Tribes, and TDHEs.


Juel Fairbanks
Chemical Health
Phone: 651.644.6204
www.juelfairbanks.org

Juel Fairbanks provides a safe place for adults to receive chemical dependency services. Our clients are people who struggle with addiction and/or mental health issues such as anxiety, depression, brain injury, schizophrenia and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Most of our programs serve men, 18 years old and up; however, our outpatient services include women as well.

Our organization is unique in that it was founded by an Ojibwe tribe member with the intention of enhancing the recovery process for other American Indians. Today, our facilities and services are a comfortable place for American Indians as well as other underserved populations to recover. Monthly pipe ceremonies are among the culturally specific programming offered here, with 40 years of experience helping American Indians.

Our Mission

To provide prevention, treatment and other associated services to enhance recovery from chemical dependency and dual disorders within the American Indian community and other underserved populations.


Ramsey County Adult Mental Health Services
Crisis – 651.266.7900
Information and Referral – 651.266.7890
Case Management & Mental Health Center Intake – 651.266.7890
http://www.co.ramsey.mn.us/hs/mhc/AdultMentalHealth.htm

Whom Does Ramsey County Serve?
The individuals served by Ramsey County Community Human Services, Mental Health are amongst those with the most severe forms of mental illness. Many of the individuals experience a host of factors, such as medical conditions, chemical addictions, criminal histories and poverty, which complicates their care. Most individuals served receive publicly funded health care or are uninsured.

What Services Are Available in Ramsey County?
Ramsey County’s mental health service delivery system includes both direct and purchased services. Ramsey County uses the mission and the framework prescribed by the Minnesota Comprehensive Mental Health Act to develop and enhance services. Ramsey County Community Human Services’ vision is to establish a comprehensive mental health service system that will enable consumers to live as independent as possible in the community.


For Businesses

Indian Affairs Council
Saint Paul Office • 161 Saint Anthony Ave • Suite 919 • Saint Paul, MN 55103
Bemidji Office • 3801 Bemidji Avenue NW • Suite 5 • Bemidji, MN 56601
www.indianaffairs.state.mn.us

The Minnesota Indian Affairs Council (MIAC) was established in 1963 MN Statutes Chapter 888, Sec. 2 (3:922). MIAC is the official liaison between the State of Minnesota and the 11 tribal Governments within the state. The Council provides a forum for and advises state government on issues of concern to urban Indian communities. The Council administers three programs designed to enhance economic opportunities and protect cultural resources for the state’s American Indian constituencies.

The primary duties of the council are to:
(1) analyze and make recommendations to tribal elected leaders and to members of the legislature and the governor on legislation and information on programs, proposals, and projects of importance to tribal governments and nontribal Indian organizations;

(2) assist in establishing Indian advisory councils in cooperation with state agencies that deliver services to the federally recognized tribes in Minnesota and the urban Indian communities;

(3) assist state agencies in defining what groups, organizations, committees, councils, or individuals are eligible for delivery of their respective services;

(4) assist in ensuring the provision of resources and the delivery of services to the federally recognized tribes in Minnesota and the urban Indian communities;

(5) recommend to tribal governments and the state government the means to enhance the delivery of services to the members of federally recognized tribes in Minnesota by local, state, and national units of government;

(6) assist state agencies in implementing and updating studies of services delivered to the federally recognized tribes in Minnesota and urban Indian communities;

(7) provide, for the benefit of all levels of state government, a continuing liaison between state governmental bodies and elected tribal leaders;

(8) interact with private organizations involved with Indian people that develop and implement programs to assist Indian people, when such programs may affect state agencies and departments;

(9) develop educational programs, community organization programs, leadership development programs, motivational programs, and business development programs for Indian persons who have been, are, or may be subject to prejudice and discrimination;

(10) review data provided by the commissioner of human services under section 260C.215 WELFARE OF CHILDREN, subdivision 5, and present recommendations to elected tribal leaders on the out-of-home placement of Indian children; and

(11) prepare a proposed agenda for the annual summit of elected tribal leaders, legislative leaders, and the governor.

The MIAC plays a central role in the development of state legislation. They monitor programs that affect the state’s American Indian population and tribal governments. Minnesota was the first state in the nation to establish an Indian Affairs agency and provided a model for other states to follow. The Indian Affairs Board is made up of the 11 Tribal Chairs or their designees, a member of the Governor’s official staff, the Commissioner of Education, Human Services, Natural Resources, Human Rights, Employment and Economic Development, Corrections, Minnesota Housing Finance Agency, Iron Range resource and rehabilitations, Health, Transportation, Veterans Affairs, and Administration, or their designees.

The Indian Affairs Council’s vision is to strive for the social, economic and political justice for all American Indian people living in the State of Minnesota, while embracing our traditional cultural and spiritual values.


Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce
2345 Rice Street, Suite 200
St. Paul, MN 55113
Phone: 612.877.2117 | Fax: 651.444.5270
www.maicc.org

The MAICC supports and promotes Native American professionalism and excellence in business.
The Minnesota American Indian Chamber of Commerce provides services for Chamber members in education, networking, and technical assistance. Some of the services the MAICC provides are: a bi-monthly Hot Sheet that gives important events and announcements to members, a Bid Sheet for contractors that provides a summary of current projects and other bidding information, a Resource Directory that lists members businesses and their services, and MAICC Business Builders luncheons that present marketing and networking opportunities.


Native American Community Development Institute
1414 East Franklin Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.235.4976 | Fax: 612-392-0064
www.nacdi.org

The Native American Community Development Institute (NACDI), an American Indian community development intermediary organization – the first of its kind in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. The organization is configured as an alliance of the major Indian nonprofits and several Indian businesses in the metropolitan area committed to community-building through sector economic development and large-scale development. Foremost in our transformation plan to develop a new community infrastructure is to build community capacity and assets within high growth economic sectors.

Currently, no alignment and capacity-building structure exists in the American Indian community for social or economic change. To begin to develop a community-based strategy for social and economic change, NACDI will first work with American Indian nonprofits to rebuild their community-driven structure that responds to the demands and opportunities of the economy. Specifically, we will work with American Indian nonprofits on sector strategy development in Land and Housing, Entertainment and Media and Health and Wellness. These three “sectors” share the characteristics of high job growth potential; opportunities for asset development; and sustainability as a part of longer-term American and global industry growth.


Pow Wow Grounds
1414 E. Franklin Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.545.5598
Hours: Mon – Sat: 7:00 am – 8:00 pm, Sun: 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

We are a Cafe in All My Relations Art Gallery. Offering specialty coffee drinks, baked goods, smoothies, sandwiches and signature wild rice products!


Upper Midwest American Indian Center
1035 West Broadway Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55411
Phone: 612.522.4436 | Fax: 612.522.8855

Upper Midwest American Indian Center is a multi-service non-profit agency serving the community for over 30 years.

Programs:
American Indian Adoption Program
Foster Care “Come Back Home” Program
Little Steps Early Head Start Program
Mental Health Support Program


Woodland Indian Crafts
Charles Stately, Owner
1530 East Franklin Avenue (inside the Minneapolis American Indian Center)
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.874.7766 | Fax: 612.879.1795

Handmade gifts by local artist; beadwork, jewelry, native music, bead supplies, posters, T-shirts, greeting cards, etc.


Woodlands National Bank
1113 East Franklin Avenue, Suite 108
Minneapolis, MN 55404
Phone: 612.230.6960 | Fax: 612.230.6970
Lobby Hours: Mon. – Thurs. 9:00 – 4:30, Fri. 9:00 – 6:00
www.woodlandsnationalbank.com

Woodlands National Bank is a full service bank with knowledgeable professionals ready to assist you with your banking and financial needs. No matter where you are in life, or what your banking needs may be, we have a solution for you.

Comments are closed.